heianillegalalien:

rules: just insert your answers to the questions below. tag at least 10 followers (which is a problem because no one follows me whoops)

tagged by: spideymalik

name: katherine

nickname: kathy

birthday: dec 19

gender: cis female

sexuality: people who look like teddy bears

height: 5’8”

timezone: central

what time and date it is there: 11:56 pm 8/25/14

average hours of sleep: around 10 (i usually go to sleep around 9 and I ALWAYS wake up around 7 at the latest)

otps: a bunch of random crack ships that I have with the orchestra club

the last thing i googled: yuriko kaida

first word that comes to mind: sleep

what i last said to a family member: “I love you too. Bye.” 

one place that makes me happy and why: The fifth floor of the physics building, because it’s a beautiful view, it’s quiet and calming, and because most of my friends outside of the club are physics majors I know most everyone there so it’s nice 

how many blankets i sleep under: one or two

favourite beverage: banana chocolate smoothie

the last movie i watched in the cinema: I think it was the days of future past but I don’t really remember

three things i can’t live without: my laptop, my endless supply of food in my pantry, and the people around me

something i plan on learning: KOREAN

a piece of advice for all my followers: I don’t know how many people this will help but I hope it does because it helped me a lot over the past six months. If you have a phone or a computer, make a folder with pictures with you, specifically, and people you know or knew and still respect where you’re all smiling and having fun. Make your favorite one your background. If you don’t have a phone or computer, try to replicate this effect with pictures themselves, quotes that remind you of these people, anything. Look at them whenever you want to hurt yourself or feel suicidal, even if it’s everyday. Even though it won’t help as a long term solution, it will help bide the time to talk to someone the next day if you can’t have access to help immediately. 

you have to listen to this song: "Bethena" by Scott Joplin

my blog(s): purpuraalko (which, by this point, is math. JUST MATH.) and @fried-marshmallows (which is me drawing and failing. there’s only like 2 things on it right now so don’t even bother :( )

i tag: onceinabluemoony (sorry for double tagging), abderiaan and concerto4art-and-education 

no-more-ramen:

~Can also be made vegetarian~
What you’ll need:  - box of pasta (I used rotini)  - butter - milk - shredded cheese (I used 3 cups of white and yellow cheddar) - vegetables of your choice (I used broccoli) - meat of your choice (*optional*) (I used cubbed ham)
1.) Preheat oven to 350. Cook pasta (and meat if you want meat), cook vegetables. 2.) After draining pasta, put into an oven safe dish. Add 3/4 cup of milk and two tablespoons of butter. Mix until the butter is melted.  3.) Add just enough cheese so that the amount of pasta you used gets nice and cheesey when you mix it up.  4.) Add veggies (and meat) then mix it all up. Add more cheese if needed.  5.) Put a top later of cheese over the mix, cover and put into oven for 5 minutes or until the layer of cheese is melted through.
I used a pound of pasta and this made 4 servings. The total cost of this dish was $8. Price obviously will change if you choose to add more than one veggie or meat, or if you exclude meat.

no-more-ramen:

~Can also be made vegetarian~

What you’ll need:
- box of pasta (I used rotini)
- butter
- milk
- shredded cheese (I used 3 cups of white and yellow cheddar)
- vegetables of your choice (I used broccoli)
- meat of your choice (*optional*) (I used cubbed ham)

1.) Preheat oven to 350. Cook pasta (and meat if you want meat), cook vegetables.
2.) After draining pasta, put into an oven safe dish. Add 3/4 cup of milk and two tablespoons of butter. Mix until the butter is melted.
3.) Add just enough cheese so that the amount of pasta you used gets nice and cheesey when you mix it up.
4.) Add veggies (and meat) then mix it all up. Add more cheese if needed.
5.) Put a top later of cheese over the mix, cover and put into oven for 5 minutes or until the layer of cheese is melted through.

I used a pound of pasta and this made 4 servings. The total cost of this dish was $8. Price obviously will change if you choose to add more than one veggie or meat, or if you exclude meat.

mindfuckmath:

Will Prime Numbers (@_primes_) tweet the final prime number with 140 digits before the heat death of the universe?
Prime Numbers (@_primes_) is a Twitter feed that tweets successive prime numbers on an hourly basis. As we know, tweets are limited to 140 characters and the number of prime numbers extend infinitely beyond 140 digits.  So how long will it take @_primes_ to reach the final prime number with 140 digits, thus ending its awesome yet tedious mathematical mission? More importantly, will it reach that final tweet before the heat death of the universe in roughly 10^100 years?  As it says on the homepage of @_primes_: 
Every prime number, eventually. (Or the heat death of the universe; whichever happens first.)
Let’s start by finding out what the final prime number with 140 digits is. A quick search on WolframAlpha reveals that this is a number of 139 consecutive 9s and a 7, which is just 3 shy of 10^140.  Next, we want to figure out the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140 or π*(10^140) which is equal to the number of hours needed. Using the prime number theorem, which is: 
π (N) ~ N/ln N 
or, our number (10^140) divided by the natural logarithm of our number (322.36191302) is equal to the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140. We plug in our numbers and get:
π (10^140) ~ 10^140/322.36191302
π (10^140) ~ 3.10210… × 10^137
Therefore, when we factor in the primes that have already been tweeted (@_primes_ is currently on 5 digit primes, which barely scratches the surface) that final tweet will take a little less than 3.10210… × 10^137 hours.  So what’s that in years?  Well, there are 8760 hours in a year and when we divide our number of hours (3.10210… × 10^137) by 8760 we get 3.54121… × 10^133 years.  This is significantly longer than the 10^100 years until the end of everything.  As long as @_primes_ is able to tweet on an hourly basis until the heat death of the universe, it will still be a long ways away from reaching its final tweet. 
* Note that π here is not referring to the mathematical constant of 3.14… rather it signifies the number of prime numbers below or at the number given.  

mindfuckmath:

Will Prime Numbers (@_primes_) tweet the final prime number with 140 digits before the heat death of the universe?

Prime Numbers (@_primes_) is a Twitter feed that tweets successive prime numbers on an hourly basis. As we know, tweets are limited to 140 characters and the number of prime numbers extend infinitely beyond 140 digits.  So how long will it take @_primes_ to reach the final prime number with 140 digits, thus ending its awesome yet tedious mathematical mission? More importantly, will it reach that final tweet before the heat death of the universe in roughly 10^100 years?  As it says on the homepage of @_primes_: 

Every prime number, eventually. (Or the heat death of the universe; whichever happens first.)

Let’s start by finding out what the final prime number with 140 digits is. A quick search on WolframAlpha reveals that this is a number of 139 consecutive 9s and a 7, which is just 3 shy of 10^140.  Next, we want to figure out the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140 or π*(10^140) which is equal to the number of hours needed. Using the prime number theorem, which is: 

π (N) ~ N/ln N 

or, our number (10^140) divided by the natural logarithm of our number (322.36191302) is equal to the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140. We plug in our numbers and get:

π (10^140) ~ 10^140/322.36191302

π (10^140) ~ 3.10210… × 10^137

Therefore, when we factor in the primes that have already been tweeted (@_primes_ is currently on 5 digit primes, which barely scratches the surface) that final tweet will take a little less than 3.10210… × 10^137 hours.  So what’s that in years?  Well, there are 8760 hours in a year and when we divide our number of hours (3.10210… × 10^137) by 8760 we get 3.54121… × 10^133 years.  This is significantly longer than the 10^100 years until the end of everything.  As long as @_primes_ is able to tweet on an hourly basis until the heat death of the universe, it will still be a long ways away from reaching its final tweet. 

* Note that π here is not referring to the mathematical constant of 3.14… rather it signifies the number of prime numbers below or at the number given.  

randommarius:

“Phyllotactic Portrait of Fibonacci” by Robert BoschMathematical artist Robert Bosch created this picture by adapting a well-known portrait of the Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo (c. 1170—1250), who was better known as Fibonacci.Fibonacci described the sequence that bears his name in his 1202 book Liber Abaci, although the sequence was known to Indian mathematicians as early as the 6th century. The Fibonacci sequence begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, the key property being that each of the terms from the third term onwards is the sum of the preceding two terms. Fibonacci used his sequence to study the growth of a population of rabbits, under idealising assumptions. The sequence can be used to model various biological phenomena, including the arrangement of leaves on a stem, which is known as phyllotaxis. Robert Bosch used a model of phyllotaxis to produce this picture. He explains:Using a simple model of phyllotaxis (the process by which plant leaves or seeds are arranged on their stem), I positioned dots on a square canvas. By varying the radii of the dots, I made them resemble Fibonacci. Incidentally, the number of dots, 6765, is a Fibonacci number. So are the number of clockwise spirals (144) and counterclockwise spirals (233) formed by the dots. A framed version of this picture is currently being exhibited at the Bridges Exhibition at Gwacheon National Science Museum, Seoul. You can read more about the picture here: http://gallery.bridgesmathart.org/exhibitions/2014-bridges-conference/bobb. The same page discusses another version of the picture, also by Robert Bosch, but this time illustrating the Travelling Salesman problem. +Patrick Honner has posted about the other version of the picture here: https://plus.google.com/+PatrickHonner/posts/ALvhM8JK5kJ.Relevant linksRobert Bosch’s website: http://www.dominoartwork.com Wikipedia on Leonardo Fibonacci: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FibonacciThe On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences on the Fibonacci numbers: http://oeis.org/A000045Fibonacci numbers in nature: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#In_natureAs well as featuring in this picture, the Fibonacci number 6765 is the name of an asteroid: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6765_Fibonacci“We’re also a band.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fibonaccis)(Found via +Patrick Honner.)#art #artist #mathematics #scienceeverydayhttp://click-to-read-mo.re/p/8MYa/53e952d4

randommarius:

“Phyllotactic Portrait of Fibonacci” by Robert Bosch

Mathematical artist Robert Bosch created this picture by adapting a well-known portrait of the Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo (c. 1170—1250), who was better known as Fibonacci.

Fibonacci described the sequence that bears his name in his 1202 book Liber Abaci, although the sequence was known to Indian mathematicians as early as the 6th century. The Fibonacci sequence begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, the key property being that each of the terms from the third term onwards is the sum of the preceding two terms. 

Fibonacci used his sequence to study the growth of a population of rabbits, under idealising assumptions. The sequence can be used to model various biological phenomena, including the arrangement of leaves on a stem, which is known as phyllotaxis. Robert Bosch used a model of phyllotaxis to produce this picture. He explains:

Using a simple model of phyllotaxis (the process by which plant leaves or seeds are arranged on their stem), I positioned dots on a square canvas. By varying the radii of the dots, I made them resemble Fibonacci. Incidentally, the number of dots, 6765, is a Fibonacci number. So are the number of clockwise spirals (144) and counterclockwise spirals (233) formed by the dots. 

A framed version of this picture is currently being exhibited at the Bridges Exhibition at Gwacheon National Science Museum, Seoul. You can read more about the picture here: http://gallery.bridgesmathart.org/exhibitions/2014-bridges-conference/bobb. The same page discusses another version of the picture, also by Robert Bosch, but this time illustrating the Travelling Salesman problem. +Patrick Honner has posted about the other version of the picture here: https://plus.google.com/+PatrickHonner/posts/ALvhM8JK5kJ.

Relevant links

Robert Bosch’s website: http://www.dominoartwork.com 

Wikipedia on Leonardo Fibonacci: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci

The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences on the Fibonacci numbers: http://oeis.org/A000045

Fibonacci numbers in nature: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#In_nature

As well as featuring in this picture, the Fibonacci number 6765 is the name of an asteroid: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6765_Fibonacci

“We’re also a band.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fibonaccis)

(Found via +Patrick Honner.)

#art #artist #mathematics #scienceeveryday

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/8MYa/53e952d4

The department heads, they are saying to me, ‘You shall not make advertisements in lecture.’ But they are not yet saying, ‘You shall not bring weapons to lecture’ So, we have this blowgun.

Calculus professor, who then proceeded to hit our makeshift bull’s-eye with the blowgun five times in a row and shout “Fuck your probability distribution!”  (via mathprofessorquotes)

This is the most accurate depiction of a mathematician I have ever seen.

(via dumb-science-jokes)

The department heads, they are saying to me, ‘You shall not make advertisements in lecture.’ But they are not yet saying, ‘You shall not bring weapons to lecture’ So, we have this blowgun.

Calculus professor, who then proceeded to hit our makeshift bull’s-eye with the blowgun five times in a row and shout “Fuck your probability distribution!”  (via mathprofessorquotes)

historical-nonfiction:

Why is this scientist smiling? Maybe it is because he proved every person who disagreed with him wrong. Probably it is because he got a Nobel Prize to shove in their faces. This Dr. Barry Marshall who was convinced ulcers were caused by bacteria. He started experimenting, and found that patients given antibiotic therapy would quickly recover. But when he published his results, no doctor took it seriously. So Dr. Marshall decided to prove it  — on himself. He drank a cocktail of bacteria, and within a week had massive stomach pain. He biopsied his own stomach, and it was an ulcer. Dr. Marshall gave himself antibiotics and the ulcer disappeared. He suffered fevers, daily vomiting, and breath so bad his mother commented on it. But it was all worth it for the shiny Nobel Prize.

historical-nonfiction:

Why is this scientist smiling? Maybe it is because he proved every person who disagreed with him wrong. Probably it is because he got a Nobel Prize to shove in their faces. This Dr. Barry Marshall who was convinced ulcers were caused by bacteria. He started experimenting, and found that patients given antibiotic therapy would quickly recover. But when he published his results, no doctor took it seriously. So Dr. Marshall decided to prove it  — on himself. He drank a cocktail of bacteria, and within a week had massive stomach pain. He biopsied his own stomach, and it was an ulcer. Dr. Marshall gave himself antibiotics and the ulcer disappeared. He suffered fevers, daily vomiting, and breath so bad his mother commented on it. But it was all worth it for the shiny Nobel Prize.